Alpha Rev : Bloom

Bloom

Alpha Rev

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“I want the band to mark a moment in time, to celebrate the being of something new; The light at the end of the tunnel, the first step toward revealing something that needs to be seen,” says singer-songwriter Casey McPherson of Alpha Rev. Following the Triple A Radio success of New Morning (2010), the band’s third album Bloom (March 19, 2013 on Kirtland Records) is a set of personally transformative and redemptive songs, born in the spirit of creative expansion, and a mandate to blossom and grow.

“Alpha Rev is a collective of musicians,” explains McPherson, “Once you join, you’re never really gone.” On Bloom, Alex Dun- lap holds down the bass, while Brian Batch (violin, viola) and Dave Wiley (cello) serve as the band’s string section. The play- ers were joined in the studio by a longtime friend of McPher- son's, Dwight Baker (Brandi Carlile, Bob Schneider); he oversaw the project in his Austin studio. Producer Jamie Kenney (Marc Broussard) also worked with the band for two songs on Bloom. “Austin is a great city that takes care of musicians; it helps foster ideas and creativity,” says McPherson.

Since his beginnings in Jackson, Texas, where he was classically trained on piano, McPherson has traveled the distance: Working in a recording studio by age 16, at 17 he was touring overseas as a keyboard player; at 19 he formed Endochine, its name translating from its Latin and Greek roots as “to explode from within.” Turning once again to ancient alphabets for his band’s handle, “Alpha Rev is a combination of the Greek word for the beginning, and the incredible Latin prefix rev, as in re- volve, revolt, reveal,” he says. The band’s Hollywood Records debut, New Morning (produced by David Kahne) rose to #3 on the Triple A chart, reaching an audience 40 million listeners- strong. The title song and “Phoenix Burn” also entered the charts.

Yet while scaling his own dreams, McPherson lost both his fa- ther and brother to suicide. Forming in 2005, Alpha Rev, became a vehicle to grapple with the outpouring of grief that results from losses of that magnitude. Today, McPherson helps others who've lost family to depression and suicide as a volunteer spokesper- son for the National Institute of Mental Health organization, Mental Health America of Texas [http://mhatexas.org].

“Music changes people,”says McPherson. “We’re trying to find happiness in music as opposed to self-destruction,” he says. “It’s my desire, and has always been to be a part of our group, that we make each other better musicians, we make each other better men, we challenge each other, we fight and we forgive. Every- body in the band has really adopted that ideal,” says McPherson. “Alpha Rev is more than a band name---it’s a motto.”